Variation in Use of Tympanostomy Tubes: Impact of Privately Owned Ambulatory Surgery Centers.

Jennifer N. Cooper, Charles A. Elmaraghy.

Ambulatory Surgery Centers, The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 204, janvier 2019.

Abstract: Objective

To determine whether privately owned ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) increase pediatric tympanostomy tube use in their surrounding communities.

Study design

We studied children <5 years of age who underwent outpatient tympanostomy tube placement in New York or Florida in 2010-2014. Data came from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Ambulatory Surgery Databases, which include all outpatient surgeries in these states. Population characteristics came from the US Census’ American Community Survey. Weighted conditionally autoregressive models were used to assess the association between the zip code–level proportion of tympanostomy tube procedures performed in privately owned ASCs and the rate of tympanostomy tube use.

Results

In 2010-2014, 106 privately owned ASCs in Florida and 29 in New York performed tympanostomy tube placement in young children. After accounting for zip code–level urban/rural status, socioeconomic status (SES), and the proportion of residents of non-Hispanic white race, children residing in zip codes in the top tertile of privately owned ASC use in Florida had 52% greater tympanostomy tube use than children from zip codes in the bottom tertile (P < .001). In New York, high-SES zip codes with any use of privately owned ASCs had 2.6 times greater tympanostomy tube use than other high-SES zip codes (P < .001). This association was not present in low-SES areas.

Conclusions

The presence of privately owned ASCs is associated with increased tympanostomy tube use in young children.